Cigar history has followed a difficult path between crime and pleasure. Demonized on arrival to Europe, in which latter tobacco trade was monopolized.

During a century, between 1717 & 1817, the Spanish Crown prohibited cigar production in the Caribbean Islands & the rest of the American Colonies, and although its precious leaves continued growing on the other side of the ocean, the “puro” cigar rolling that we all know today, could only be done at the Sevilla Royal Factory, supplying an even more demanding market in the world.

But such absurd prerogative led to the rising prices of tobacco and of course the birth of the Bandolero, an intrepid figure that hid on mysterious roads with tobacco leaves & rolled in other countries, led to an excellent price and authenticity combination, dressed with the charm of what was then forbidden.

The cigars that we offer here today know the secrets of those mystic Bandoleros old routes, from places where tobacco plantation still a long tradition, thru countries where wise hands shaped them, until its final destination, where a cigar expert recognizes its aroma and flavor – the quality of a unique product.

Available in 8 Sizes:
Barbaros (4.375 x 60); Traviesos (5 x 50); Soberbios (5.5 x 50); Colosales (6 x 54); Tremendos (5 x 50); Picaros (5.5 x 54); Vanidosos (6 x 54) and Pretencios (6.5 x 60)

Reviews:

Bandolero delivers a totally different profile and if you like spice on a cigar, this one is for you – Cigar Coop

There are notes of cedar and earth and a barely perceptible hint of cocoa on the finish. The cigar itself is beautiful and impeccably made. The draw is consistent and the burn is true throughout, which is the mark of a truly premium hand-crafted cigar – Patrick Miller (Davidus Cigar)

The Bandolero serves up notes that were hearty and enjoyable, and if they had a name attached to them that was well-known to the consumer I am convinced that they would be chased down like many rock stars have their cigars chased down.- The Cigar Authority

It shows complexity from beginning to end and with that is a nice bit of depth. – Seth’s Humidor